Grief and sadness an obstacle for many after Humboldt Broncos crash

Kevin Matechuk of Colonsay, Sask., wasn’t prepared for the emotions that hit him when he visited the site of the Humboldt Broncos bus crash.His son, Layne, who is now 19, had been in a coma and was learning to talk and walk again due to a severe brain injury. Matechuk’s wife, Shelley, was too afraid to travel.Story continues below

READ MORE: Saskatchewan government developing organ donor registryWhile in the area for his job as a manager at an agricultural company, he stopped at the site north of Tisdale, Sask., with another Broncos parent.“The emotion, it put me down on my knees and I couldn’t even go back to work. I just had to go home to hug Layne. I had to hold him after.”“It was very, very emotional.”Saturday marks the first anniversary of the April 6 crash that killed 16 people and injured 13 on the junior hockey team’s bus. The Humboldt Broncos were on their way to a playoff game when the bus hit a semi-truck after its driver blew a stop sign at a rural intersection.READ MORE: Family of Humboldt Bronco Logan Boulet announce April 7 as Green Shirt Day ‘to honour his legacy’Dr. Kristi Wright, president of the Psychology Association of Saskatchewan, said she wouldn’t be surprised if many of the people affected by the crash — family members, friends and first responders — are experiencing post-traumatic stress disorder.“Death in itself is an awful event,” she said in an interview. “For people who have struggled with mental health, this can make it worse.”Joanne Ginter, a senior psychologist with Sundancer Psychological Services in Calgary, said the anniversary is significant for people.“It marks (that) you’ve gone through the first of everything — the first holidays, the first birthday,” she said. “It’s a time that people come together and kind of start marking off moving forward.”WATCH BELOW: Coverage of the Humboldt Broncos bus crashContinuing the ‘Logan Boulet Effect’ by promoting organ donation