Manitoba's boreal forest gets two big endorsements for UNESCO World Heritage Site status

Manitoba's boreal forest gets two big endorsements for UNESCO World Heritage Site status

After 14 years of trying, Manitoba’s east side boreal forest is finally poised to become a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Two reports headed to the UN next month both recommend approving Pimachiowin Aki as a mixed cultural and natural heritage site.

“Manitoba is proud to continue its support of this important project and we remain confident the bid will be successful,” said Sustainable Development Minister Rochelle Squires.  “This unique and environmentally important part of the province is worthy of our protection and we are pleased to see support for our efforts continue to grow.”

Both the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) and the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), advisory bodies to the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, are endorsing adding the forest to the list.

Pimachiowin Aki means “the land that gives life,” and includes 29,040 square kilometres of boreal forest spanning the Manitoba–Ontario boundary. 

Four First Nations — Bloodvein, Little Grand Rapids, Pauingassi and Poplar River — are involved in the project. 

“We very much appreciate the support we have received from the governments of Manitoba, Ontario and Canada,” said William Young of the Bloodvein First Nation and Pimachiowin Aki spokesperson.  “We respect the process but remain optimistic that the recommendations will be accepted.”

The decision will be made a the World Heritage Committee 42nd session in Bahrain from June 24-July 4. 


Published at Wed, 16 May 2018 16:57:06 -0400